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The Mystery of The Macaron

written by EatOut 24th October 2014

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Most sweet teeth out there can agree there are few things that taste better with a deliciously dark roasted espresso or Capuccino, than a Macaron.

The Macaron (not to be confused with the Macaroon) is a heavily debated little piece of confectionary goodness. Known mainly as a French pastry, there is controversy and debate over its origins. The bible of French cuisine, Larousse Gastronomique, pegs the birth of the Macron at a convent near Comery; yet he Italians have a different story.

When Catherine de Medici of Italy married Henry II of France in 1533, she of course brought her own pastry chefs from the motherland. It is said the Macaron was introduced to France this way. There is even a connection to the French Revolution: Two nuns seeking asylum, famously called the ‘Macaron Sisters’, sold the delicacy on the streets of Nancy to pay for their room and board. It was not until the 1830s that macarons began to be served two-by-two with the addition of jams, liqueurs, and spices.

Pierre Desfontaines of the French pâtisserie Ladurée has sometimes been credited with its creation in the early part of the 20th century, but another baker, Claude Gerbet, also claims to have invented it History aside, most sweet teeth out there can agree there are few things that taste better with a deliciously dark roasted espresso or Capuccino, than a Macaron. The ‘modern macaron’ is composed of two almond meringue discs filled with a layer of buttercream, jam, or ganache filling.

Best of all, you can find these little puppies at several local patisseries and cafes, including the newly opened Suite 101 at Tribe Hotel, Mama’s Patisserie at ABC Place, The Gallery at Sankara Hotel, Cafe Villa Rosa at Kempinski and Zen Garden.

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